East Bay Edition

Big Breakfast, Lower Body Mass

Eat More in the Morning, Less at Dinnertime

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A study of more than 50,000 people in the Czech Republic by the Seventh-Day Adventist Loma Linda University, in California, found that those that made breakfast their largest meal of the day had lower body mass index (BMI) levels. Lunch as the largest daily meal showed the next best results. The researchers concluded that timing and frequency of meals play a role in predicting weight loss or gain. The two factors associated with higher BMI were eating more than three meals a day (snacks were counted as extra meals) and making dinner the day’s largest meal.


This article appears in the February 2018 issue of Natural Awakenings.

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