East Bay Edition
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Feed Feed

Cause and Effect

Activists Will ‘Sue’ Monsanto in Mock Trial

petrmalinak/Shutterstock.com

Monsanto, the U.S.-based, multinational producer of agricultural products infamous for its controversial Roundup herbicide, will be “sued” for crimes against humanity in the independent International Criminal Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, on World Food Day, October 16.

Plaintiffs include the Organic Consumers Association, International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements, Navdanya, Regeneration International, and Millions Against Monsanto, along with dozens of global food, farming and environmental justice groups.

The court, developed in 2011, will use the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to assess damages for Monsanto’s acts against humans and the environment. The court will also attempt to reform international criminal law to include crimes against the environment, or ecocide, as a prosecutable criminal offense. It has determined that prosecuting ecocide as a criminal offense is the only way to guarantee the rights of humans to a healthy environment and the right of nature to be protected.


Source: NaturalSociety.com


This article appears in the October 2016 issue of Natural Awakenings.

Edit ModuleShow Tags

More from Natural Awakenings

Feeding Healthy Habits

Today’s barrage of junk food ads can easily influence kids for the worse, but 10 strategies, including visiting farmers’ markets, teaching cooking skills and implementing device-free family meals, can help them choose to eat better.

Beyond Sustainability

Farmers are increasingly exploring inexpensive organic methods to return microbial diversity to the soil, which could help mitigate a warming planet by allowing soil to absorb more carbon.

Aysha Akhtar on Our Symphony With Animals

Through her personal story as a survivor of childhood abuse and the stories of others, the neurologist demonstrates the scientific bond between animals and humans—and how they can heal each other.

Take It Easy on the Eggs

Eating three to four eggs a week increases heart disease mortality by 6 percent and all-cause mortality by 8 percent, a new study found.

Savor Cherries to Lower Metabolic Syndrome Risk

Montmorency tart cherries in juice or capsules lower systolic blood pressure and insulin levels within hours, reducing factors that lead to metabolic syndrome.

Add your comment: